Viewing entries tagged
meaningful life

Courage and the fruits of failure

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Courage and the fruits of failure

I started this year with the decision to end an important chapter in my life. It has been obvious to me for some months now that the online business I founded in early 2017, whilst living on a farm in rural KwaZulu Natal, was loosing momentum and getting pushed further and further from my priority list. The less energy and time I had to give to nurturing and growing YOGICOMM, the less it fulfilled its purpose, and the less important it became in my clients’ lives. And so, I’ve decided to close shop. As I do this, I’m taking stock and having a good look at the (online) space I created and why I created it. I would like to share with you some of things that have struck me as valuable and worth carrying forward with me as I embark on a new chapter.

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Blue part II: Getting lost in the distance

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Blue part II: Getting lost in the distance

Blue is the colour of distance. Blue is the colour that dissolves into the molecules of the atmosphere at the reaches of horizon. If I close my eyes and conjure blue, I am transported to a state in which I drift, at peace, through endlessness. Writer, traveller, luminary, Rebecca Solnit has written a meditation on the art of getting lost. A Field guide to Getting Lost is part memoir, part scientific discussion, part poetic flowering. It is an essential companion for an intrepid traveller, or day-dreamer, or misfit.

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Cultivating inner wholeness: shadows and stranger selves

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Cultivating inner wholeness: shadows and stranger selves

One of the most luminous and profound commencement addresses I have ever seen was by Parker Palmer. Palmer was being awarded the first ever honorary degree at Naropa University in Colorado in 2015. Naropa was founded in 1974 by the Tibetan Buddhist teacher and Oxford alumnus Chogyam Trungpa. The university was intended to be an experiment in the synergy of contemporaryWestern scholarship methodologies and timeless tenets of Eastern wisdom. Palmer’s speech draws on a life of experience - he is in his mid-70s - and snatches of what can only be transcendent insight to layout his six pillars of meaningful human existence

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